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    CCIA Top Issues

    Grow the economy and promote private construction

    The construction industry is susceptible to the impact of regulations, tax policy, funding decisions, and the health of the overall economy. CCIA and its divisions promote policies that both support and promote sustained economic growth. Laws and regulations should be geared toward creating an economic environment where developers feel confident enough to make new investments.

    Keep infrastructure programs funded and up-to-date

    CCIA’s members that work in the public market rely on certainty in specifications, efficiency in administration, dependable funding, and timely payments. Our members work for private companies but they also work for federal, state, and local governments where they build projects like schools, water and sewer treatment facilities, and highways, roads, and bridges.

    Reasonable regulation

    CCIA’s members work in a heavily regulated segment of the economy. The construction industry works best when there are reasonable, rational regulations that take into account the real cost/benefit analysis of regulations before they are promulgated.

    Safe, legal workforce

    CCIA’s members are committed to promoting and expanding policies that provide a safe, legal working environment to their well-trained and efficient construction workforce.

    State False Claims

    CCIA opposes an expansion of the State False Claims Act to include construction programs. State False Claims Acts are easily used in unintended ways for improper purposes and legitimate state contractors can easily be accused of making false claims even when no false claim is committed. Under a State False Claims Act, any contract dispute can easily be challenged as a false claim by state agencies, and good contractors will be run out of business and hard working people will lose their jobs.

    Unlimited Statute of Limitations

    CCIA supports changes to current Connecticut statutes to address the 2012 state Supreme Court case, State of Connecticut vs. Lombardo Brothers, which held that there is no statute of limitations against the state for claims against contractors for alleged construction or design defects on state construction projects. CCIA believes that adopting a statute of limitations for breach of contract actions brought by the state patterned after the comparable federal statute would easily address the Court’s decision without damage to the state or the industry. Left alone, the situation could lead to unintended long-term consequences.